Assisting families of missing hikers.

Mission Statement

With safety and compassion as our core principles, the Fowler-O’Sullivan Foundation provides assistance to families of missing hikers, connects them to vetted resources, facilitates searches on their behalf once official efforts have been suspended, and supports initiatives to prevent future missing hiker cases.

Not knowing is a loved one's worst nightmare.

When a loved one goes missing, you’ll try anything to find them, even after the authorities stop looking. But how do you know what to do and who to trust? When the missing person is a hiker, especially if they disappeared far from home, there is so much to do and it is all so overwhelming. The Fowler-O’Sullivan Foundation can help.

 

"You never forget a person who came to you with a torch in the dark" - M.Rose

Our diverse team bring years of experience together to help families of missing hikers navigate through an extremely difficult time. We connect families to vetted search resources, provide funding when possible and help organize volunteer search efforts. We also provide advice on working with the authorities, the press, and social media campaigns and offer investigative and other assistance free of charge to the families of the missing.

 
 

“Powerlessness is an excruciating pain;
it is torture insurmountable.”

— Richelle E. Goodrich

Prevention and hiker safety are high priorities of our foundation.

The Fowler-O’Sullivan Foundation supports a variety of Preventative Search and Rescue (PSAR) efforts.  This includes educational programs to prevent hikers from becoming lost, advice on what to do when lost or injured in the wilderness, providing safety information on trails, and donating GPS devices each year in the name of a missing hiker. 

 

The Fowler-O’Sullivan Foundation is named in honor of

David O’Sullivan: Missing

David disappeared while hiking the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) in California in 2017. He was last seen in Idyllwild near the San Jacinto Mountains.

 

Kris Fowler: Missing

“Sherpa” was last seen on Oct. 12, 2016, near White Pass in the Washington wilderness.

 

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